Sunday with the crows…

We often spend Sunday watching birds. This Sunday our crows were allowing us the rare opportunity of taking their photographs with a little help of a zoom lens. They were chasing the ducks and squirrels off the lawn—away from the peanuts we threw down there. They were not successful as you can see in the extra photographs we included. Here are the photographs we got—for you to enjoy them with us.

Caching Corvids

Did you know that the corvid-family of birds cache food for later — saving it in multiple spots for many months? They also watch other birds cache food and steal it–moving it for themselves. They are sneaky. They pay attention. This is interesting. There brain size to body ratio is relative to primates. They are social. We really enjoy watching them interact, eat and check things out.

Crows in a tree...
Crows in a tree...

Their ability to remember for long periods of time is fascinating. Some corvids have been observed recovering food caches up to 250 days after hiding them. Studies suggest this is due to their ability to use spatial memory ability. What is located next to what — such as many children do. ((http://www.pigeon.psy.tufts.edu/asc/Balda/Default.htm#IV._Cache_Recovery_Tests_of_Spatial_Memory_)) “By the McDonalds over by my school mommy.” This is simply astonishing to me that corvids have such an excellent memory.

Maybe their abilities to cache food and to forward-think help them to survive when other birds are not doing so well. ((http://www.audubon.org/news/CBID_NYTimes.html))

Crows Can Recognize The Calls Of Relatives

ScienceDaily (2007-03-20) — Most of us would know our mother’s voice on the phone from the first syllable uttered. A recent Cornell study suggests that crows also can recognize the voices of their relatives.

Read the rest of the article here.

This woman did a lot of in-depth research for this study. I am not surprised in the least to find out that crows recognize each others voices. We do. We are so egocentric sometimes!