Treepies

I’ve covered the Treepies which include the generas Dendrocitta, Crypsirina, Temnurus and Platysmurus.  They all have long tails and live high in the trees, preferring to stay up high and not visiting the ground much. There are 11 species within these generas.

  1. Grey Treepie, Dendrocitta formosae
  2. Rufous Treepie, Dendrocitta vagabunda
  3. Black-faced Treepie, or Collared Treepie, Dendrocitta frontalis
  4. Sumatran Treepie, Dendrocitta occipitalis
  5. Bornean Treepie, Dendrocitta cinerascens
  6. White-bellied Treepie, Dendrocitta leucogastra
  7. Andaman Treepie, Dendrocitta bayleyi
  8. Black Racket-tailed Treepie, Crypsirina temia (formerly Dendrocitta)
  9. Hooded Treepie, Crypsirina cucullata
  10. Ratchet-tailed Treepie, Temnurus temnurus
  11. Black Magpie Platysmurus leucopterus

They are mostly found in Asia and India. They are beautiful with their long tails and elusive. Many are threatened or near threatened and endemic to particular regions.

Hooded Treepie (Crypsirina cucullata)

The Hooded Treepie (Crypsirina cucullata) is a species of bird in the Corvidae family. It is endemic to Burma.

Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.

It has grey plumage apart from black head, tail and flight feathers.

(Source: wikipedia)

Black-faced Treepie


In a bush !

Originally uploaded by H G M

The Black-faced or Black-browed Treepie (Dendrocitta frontalis) is an Asian treepie, a small perching bird of the Corvidae (crow) family.

This bird is slightly smaller than a Blue Jay and has the typical compact body and long tail of this group. The forehead, face and bib are black with the chest, neck and shoulders a light silvery or bluish-grey in colour. The back is a warm chestnut brown with similar underparts. The wing coverts are white with the primaries and tail black.

It inhabits a broad band (though often very localised) from the north eastern Indian Himalayas, Nepal and across into Burma (Myanmar) in hill forests often at quite high elevations.

It feeds mainly on invertebrates of various types, and hawks for termites in flight; it also eats fruits and berries. It probably takes similar overall food types as the other treepies.

The nest is a small, neat structure often placed in bamboo clumps, small trees or bushes at the edge of a clearing. There are usually 3-5 eggs laid.

The voice is described as varied but contains metallic notes as well as the chatter alarm call sounding similar to the other species.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black-faced_Treepie

White-Bellied Treepie


White-Bellied Treepie

Originally uploaded by AnoopAA

The White-bellied Treepie (Dendrocitta leucogastra) is a bird of the crow family endemic to the forests of southern India.

Description

The white of the head and body separate it from the sympatric Rufous Treepie. This tends to be found in more dense forest and is less associated with humans than the Rufous Treepie.

The species is often seen bowing and lowering its wings as it calls. Several birds may arrive at one tree and call repeatedly during the pre-monsoon breeding season (April-May). The nest is a platform of twigs on a medium sized tree. Three eggs are laid, ashy grey with green and grey blotches.

It is associated with mixed-species foraging flocks and is often associated with Greater Racket-tailed Drongos.

Distribution

It is found in the forests of the Western Ghats south of Goa. A record from Erimalai near Dharmapuri marks the eastern limit of the species in southern India. It has been reported from the Surat Dangs and the southeastern Ghats of Andhra Pradesh while a record from central India has been questioned.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-bellied_Treepie

White-bellied Treepie (Dendrocitta leucogastra)

The white of the head and body separate it from the sympatric Rufous Treepie. This tends to be found in more dense forest and is less associated with humans than the Rufous Treepie.

Calls

The species is often seen bowing and lowering its wings as it calls. Several birds may arrive at one tree and call repeatedly during the pre-monsoon breeding season (April-May). The nest is a platform of twigs on a medium sized tree. Three eggs are laid, ashy grey with green and grey blotches.

Listen to its call here.

It is associated with mixed-species foraging flocks and is often associated with Greater Racket-tailed Drongos.

Distribution

It is found in the forests of the Western Ghats south of Goa. A record from Erimalai near Dharmapuri marks the eastern limit of the species in southern India. It has been reported from the Surat Dangs and the southeastern Ghats of Andhra Pradesh while a record from central India has been questioned.