The Crow and the Pitcher more than fable?

The Crow and the Pitcher, originally uploaded by AnnaleeBlysse.

Scientists believe the fable of the crow and the pitcher might have been fairly accurate given the new research showing rooks using rocks to raise the level of water where a worm resided… to bring the worm up to their level.1

They are such incredibly intelligent birds. The other animal who showed fluid mechanics was the orangutan. I will bet corvids are just as smart if not smarter than many of the primates.

You can read more about the studies here.

  1. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/wildlife/5983953/Aesops-fable-is-true-shows-crow-study.html []

Rooks and tools

Corvus frugilegus
Corvus frugilegus

Researchers in the Britain may have stumbled upon something interesting about rooks that Aesop observed some two-thousand-five-hundred years before. Rooks use different size stones to raise water levels in a tube that contains a worm. Is this really a recent ‘discovery’…read Aesop’s fable The Crow and the Pitcher:

A Crow, half-dead with thirst, came upon a Pitcher which had once been full of water; but when the Crow put its beak into the mouth of the Pitcher he found that only very little water was left in it, and that he could not reach far enough down to get at it. He tried, and he tried, but at last had to give up in despair. Then a thought came to him, and he took a pebble and dropped it into the Pitcher. Then he took another pebble and dropped it into the Pitcher. Then he took another pebble and dropped that into the Pitcher. Then he took another pebble and dropped that into the Pitcher. Then he took another pebble and dropped that into the Pitcher. Then he took another pebble and dropped that into the Pitcher. At last, at last, he saw the water mount up near him, and after casting in a few more pebbles he was able to quench his thirst and save his life.

Little by little does the trick.

We like to believe that we are ingenius in our technology and research methods. But what these scientists observed in a laboratory, Aesop must have seen in his everyday observation in nature. Albeit, the rich in 500 B.C. had a lot more idle time to observe nature in its glory.

Here are a couple of videos for you to enjoy:

Video 1

Rook using the stones to raise the water level

Video 2

Corvus frugilegus
Corvus frugilegus

The Validity of the Crow Vending Machine

The validity of the Crow Vending Machine has been put into question because of misinformation given to reporters. Josh Klein never worked with Binghamton University like he claimed but the newspaper didn’t catch it. John Klein says it was a misunderstanding. Who knows what the truth is? I would like to see the experiment repeated a time or two to find out.

Read more here.