Cornish Chough

I've written about the choughs before (a detailed post about the red-billed chough, also known as the cornish chough here and The Cornish Chough poem by John Harris here) but I want to share with you these amazing photos by Andrew Green (http://www.flickr.com/photos/polandeze/).
Photo Source: Andrew Green
 
Photo Source: Andrew Green
 
Photo Source: Andrew Green
 
Photo Source: Andrew Green
 
Photo Source: Andrew Green

Red-billed Chough (Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax)

The Red-billed Chough is a popular bird in the corvidae family.

Pyrrhocorax_pyrrhocorax_-standing-8

The Red-billed Chough or Chough (pronounced chuff), Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax, is a bird in the crow family; it is one of only two species in the genus Pyrrhocorax. Its eight subspecies breed on mountains and coastal cliffs from Ireland and Great Britain east through southern Europe and North Africa to Central Asia, India and China. This bird has glossy black plumage, a long curved red bill, red legs, and a loud, ringing call. It has a buoyant acrobatic flight with widely spread primaries. The Red-billed Chough pairs for life and displays fidelity to its breeding site, which is usually a cave or crevice in a cliff face. It builds a wool-lined stick nest and lays three eggs. It feeds, often in flocks, on short grazed grassland, taking mainly invertebrate prey. Although it is subject to predation and parasitism, the main threat to this species is changes in agricultural practices, which have led to population decline and range fragmentation in Europe; however, it is not threatened globally. The Red-billed Chough, which derived its common name from the Jackdaw, was formerly associated with fire-raising, and has links with Saint Thomas Becket and the county of Cornwall. The Red-billed Chough has been depicted on postage stamps of a few countries, including the Isle of Man, with four different stamps, and The Gambia where the bird does not occur.