Javan Green Magpie (Short-tailed Magpie)

Let me introduce you to the Javan Green Magpie, also known as the the Short-tailed Magpie or Cissa Thalassina.

CorvidCorner did not take this photograph. If you are the photographer please let us know and we will add your name immediately. Thanks!

Striking bird, eh? The Javan Green Magpie is part of the Corvidae family. This beautiful bird is endemic to the mountain forests on the Southeast Asian islands of Borneo and Java. Yep, those are the only two places you can find the Javan Green Magpie. It lives in thick vegetation in the upper and middle levels of forests and makes only short flights.

Photo taken by Dr. Mithilesh Mishra in Kinabalu nature park. © All rights are reserved by him. Please ask his permission if you want to reuse it for any reason.

The Bornean subspecies jeffreyi has whitish eyes. The nominate subspecies from Java, as well as other members of the genus (Cissa), have dark reddish-brown eyes. The Javan Green Magpie is considered critically endangered with a population of about 50 to 249 mature individuals.1 ” It has also been suggested that the total population probably does not exceed 100 individuals and could number fewer than 50 individuals, as there may be only one or two dozen birds at each of up to four sites where the species was recorded from 2001 to 2011 and may still be extant (van Balen et al. 2011).”2 These birds are endangered because of habitat loss and habitat degradation driven primarily by agricultural expansion, logging and mining. Unfortunately, they are also often trapped in cages set out for the cage-bird trade business. =( Only a small number have ever been recorded in bird markets which indicates they are caught but then killed because they are not necessary.3

As you can see from the photograph above, the Javan Green Magpie mostly eats invertebrates and small vertebrate prey as well as berries (I saw a photograph of one with a berry in its mouth).  Breeding appears to take place throughout the year, with a preference for the months with highest rainfall (October -April). Clutch size is one or two (van Balen et al. 2011 and references therein).

It is slightly larger than a blue jay.

I couldn’t find much more about this beautiful bird but if you can, please share!

 

  1. http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=112641 []
  2. http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=112641&m=1 []
  3. van Balen et al. 2011 []

Magpie, the folk band

Staying with the musical theme this week, I decided to look up bands with corvid-related names and came across a lovely folk duo, Magpie with Greg Artzner and Terry Leonino. I am a big fan of folk and indie music. So let me share Magpie with you.

Magpie

Play one song here (click the little triangle below)

The Magpie by Magpie

From their own website, a biography of their band and themselves,

Magpie – Greg Artzner and Terry Leonino a brief biography

Terry Leonino and Greg Artzner began to play music together in Kent, Ohio in September of 1973. They chose the name Magpie for their band, a name which grew in personal significance for them as years went by. Terry was a student in her senior year at Kent State University in the fall of ’73, and when she graduated the following spring, she and Greg packed Greg’s VW bus and moved to the Washington, DC area. In the years since then, they have traveled and toured extensively, performed in concerts, at folk clubs and festivals around the world, and recorded many times.

Crow Cull Petition (Save the crows!)

In attempt to ‘save the song birds’  “Crows and magpies in Britain are to be trapped and killed in the first large-scale trial of culling.”  It has to be more complicated than simply the crows killing the birds. It is more likely a combination of many things but killing off many of any species cannot be the logical first step.

Please, help stop this by reading more here and here AND by signing the petition here.

Azure-winged Magpie (Cyanopica cyanus)

Pêga-azul / Azure-winged Magpie (Cyanopica cyanus), originally uploaded by Armando Caldas.

The Azure-winged Magpie (Cyanopica cyana) is a bird in the crow family. It is 31–35 cm long and similar in overall shape to the European Magpie (Pica pica) but is more slender with proportionately smaller legs and bill. It belongs to the monotypical genus Cyanopica.

It has a glossy black top to the head and a white throat. The underparts and the back are a light grey-fawn in colour with the wings and the feathers of the long (16–20 cm) tail are an azure blue. It inhabits various types of coniferous (mainly pine) and broadleaf forest, including parks and gardens in the eastern populations.

It occurs in two population groups separated by a huge geographical region between. One population lives in Western Europe, specifically the southwestern part of the Iberian Peninsula, in Spain and Portugal. The other population occurs over a much larger region of eastern Asia in most of China, Korea, Japan, and north into Mongolia. Recent genetic analysis has shown that the two populations are distinct at species level, under which the Iberian Azure-winged Magpie would take the name Cyanopica cooki, though this change has yet to be formally incorporated in the European bird list.

Often Azure-winged Magpies find food as a family group or several groups making flocks of up to 70 birds. The largest groups congregate after the breeding season and throughout the winter months. Their diet consists mainly of acorns (oak seeds) and pine nuts, extensively supplemented by invertebrates and their larvae, soft fruits and berries, and also human-provided scraps in parks and towns.

This species usually nests in loose, open colonies with a single nest in each tree. There are usually between 6–8 eggs that are incubated for 15 days.

The voice is a quick fired and metallic sounding kwink-kwink-kwink usually preceded by a single krarrah.

(Source: wikipedia.com)

Corvids and Cake

This Corvid family of birds is inspirational. They are used as symbols, mascots, even cake decorations! Here are some of the pictures I found involving corvids and cake.

Eating Crow Cake by Wild Cakes (Photo Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/itsyourdaycakes/53498212/)

 

Old Crow Cake (Photo Source: http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=260713)
Magpie Cake Topper by Kellis Cake (Photo Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/23149873@N08/3841866541/)
Painting of a magpie eating cake (Photo Source: http://www.1st-art-gallery.com/thumbnail/162760/1/Magpie-Eating-Cake.jpg)
Blue Jay Wedding Cake (Photo Source: http://allegrophotography.com/blog/2009/02/19/wedding-cakes-konditor-meister-boston-ma/)
Blue Jay cake by The Evil Plankton (Photo Source: http://fc04.deviantart.net/fs40/f/2009/025/c/1/Blue_jay_cake_by_The_EvIl_Plankton.jpg)
Blue Jay Cake by Cake Coquette (Photo Source: http://blog.cakecoquette.com/)

A Crow by any other name

Crow – Kråke

Pronounciation with an extra syllable – Kråkerøy:
http://forvo.com/word/kr%C3%A5ker%C3%B8y/

Magpie – Skjære

This one is kjære – but he pronounces it wrong so it comes close to skjære
http://forvo.com/word/kj%C3%A6re/

Raven – Ravn

An american tries to pronounce navn, he doesn’t quite get it, but its close. The r is pronounced with the tongue at the front barely touching the teeth.
http://forvo.com/word/navn/

Black Magpie (Platysmurus leucopterus atterimus)

The Black Magpie (Platysmurus leucopterus) is a species of bird in the Corvidae family. It is monotypic within the genus Platysmurus. It is found in Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, and Thailand. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests. It is threatened by habitat loss. (Source: Wikipedia)