Johnny Crow’s Garden

Following the March theme of National Read Aloud month, I am sharing another lovely story about Johnny Crow by L. Leslie Brooke. This one is titled Johnny Crow’s Garden. It is read aloud by someone, but I am not certain whom. I got the files from the Project Gutenberg e-book series. I hope you enjoy it. =) Click the following title (Johnny Crow’s Garden) to listen:

Johnny Crow’s Garden

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JOHNNY CROW’S GARDEN

A PICTURE BOOK

DRAWN BY

L. LESLIE BROOKE

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First Edition, 1903

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JOHNNY CROW’S GARDEN.

 

Johnny Crow Would dig and sow
Johnny Crow
Would dig and sow

 

Till he made a little Garden.
Till he made a little Garden.

 

And the Lion
And the Lion

 

Had a green and yellow Tie on
Had a green and yellow Tie on

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

And the Rat Wore a Feather in his Hat
And the Rat
Wore a Feather in his Hat

 

But the Bear Had nothing to wear
But the Bear
Had nothing to wear

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

So the Ape
So the Ape

 

Took his Measure with a Tape
Took his Measure with a Tape

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

Then the Crane
Then the Crane

 

Was caught in the Rain
Was caught in the Rain

 

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

And the Beaver Was afraid he had a Fever
And the Beaver
Was afraid he had a Fever

 

But the Goat Said:
But the Goat
Said:

 

"It's nothing but his Throat!"
“It’s nothing but his Throat!”

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

And the Pig Danced a Jig
And the Pig
Danced a Jig

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

Then the Stork Gave a Philosophic Talk
Then the Stork
Gave a Philosophic Talk

 

Till the Hippopotami Said: "Ask no further 'What am I?'"
Till the Hippopotami
Said: “Ask no further ‘What am I?'”

 

While the Elephant Said something quite irrelevant
While the Elephant
Said something quite irrelevant

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

And the Goose-- Well,
And the Goose–
Well,

 

the Goose was a Goose
the Goose was a Goose

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

And the Mouse
And the Mouse

 

Built himself a little House
Built himself a little House

 

Where the Cat
Where the Cat

 

Sat down beside the Mat
Sat down beside the Mat

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

And the Whale
And the Whale

 

Told a very long Tale
Told a very long Tale

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

And the Owl Was a funny old Fowl
And the Owl
Was a funny old Fowl

 

And the Fox
And the Fox

 

Put them all in the Stocks
Put them all in the Stocks

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

But Johnny Crow He let them go
But Johnny Crow
He let them go

 

And they all sat down to their dinner in a row
And they all sat down
to their dinner in a row

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

“GOOD-BYE!”

This eBook (Johnny Crow’s Garden) is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net

 

Johnny Crow’s Party

March is National Real Aloud month and so, I will do just that—read aloud. I will read aloud and record a story for you. It is public domain provided by Project Gutenberg. As you may have noticed by the title, it is crow related. =) And so, grab a cup of tea, sit back and turn the volume up and listen to a story. I will include the pictures as well! =) I hope you enjoy it.

Johnny Crow’s Party read by Me

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JOHNNY CROW’S PARTY

ANOTHER PICTURE BOOK

DRAWN BY

L. LESLIE BROOKE

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First Edition, 1907

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JOHNNY CROW’S PARTY


 

Johnny Crow Plied Rake and Hoe
Johnny Crow
Plied Rake and Hoe

 

And improved his little Garden.
And improved his little Garden.

 

And the Eagle
And the Eagle

 

Looked quite regal
Looked quite regal

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden
In Johnny Crow’s Garden

 

And the Cockatoo Said "Comment vous portez vous?"
And the Cockatoo
Said “Comment vous portez vous?”

 

And the Gander
And the Gander

 

Didn't understand her;
Didn’t understand her;

 

But the Flamingo Talked the same lingo
But the Flamingo
Talked the same lingo

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

And the Bear
And the Bear

 

Sang a sentimental Air,
Sang a sentimental Air,

 

But the Giraffe Was inclined to laugh;
But the Giraffe
Was inclined to laugh;

 

Even the Duckling Couldn't help chuckling In Johnny Crow's Garden.
Even the Duckling
Couldn’t help chuckling
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

Then the Snake
Then the Snake

 

Got entangled with the rake
Got entangled with the rake

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

And the Cock
And the Cock

 

Had a very nasty knock;
Had a very nasty knock;

 

So the Hen Said:
So the Hen
Said:

 

"We'll never come again
“We’ll never come again

 

To Johnny Crow's Garden!"
To Johnny Crow’s Garden!”

 

And the Sheep
And the Sheep

 

Went to sleep,
Went to sleep,

 

And the Armadillo
And the Armadillo

 

Used him for a pillow;
Used him for a pillow;

 

And the Porcupine
And the Porcupine

 

Said: "Wake me if for talk you pine!"
Said: “Wake me if for talk you pine!”

 

In Johnny Crow's
In Johnny Crow’s

 

Garden.
Garden.

 

And the Kangaroo
And the Kangaroo

 

Tried to paint the Roses blue
Tried to paint the Roses blue

 

Till the Camel Swallowed the Enamel.
Till the Camel
Swallowed the Enamel.

 

  And the Reindeer Said: "I'm sorry for your pain, dear!"

And the Reindeer
Said: “I’m sorry for your pain, dear!”

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

So the Chimpanzee Put the Kettle on for Tea;
So the Chimpanzee
Put the Kettle on for Tea;

 

And the Seal
And the Seal

 

Made a very big Meal;
Made a very big Meal;

 

While the Sole Shared a Muffin with the Mole In Johnny Crow's Garden.
While the Sole
Shared a Muffin with the Mole
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

  Then they picked the Flowers, and wandered in the Maze, And before they went their several ways

Then they picked the Flowers, and
wandered in the Maze,
And before they went their several ways

 

They all joined together In a Hearty Vote of Praise
They all joined together
In a Hearty Vote of Praise

 

Of Johnny Crow and his Garden.
Of Johnny Crow and his Garden.

 

endpapers

OTHER BOOKS WITH

DRAWINGS BY LESLIE BROOKE.

JOHNNY CROW’S GARDEN

JOHNNY CROW’S NEW GARDEN

THE GOLDEN GOOSE BOOK
(The Golden Goose Tom Thumb The 3 Bears The 3 Little Pigs)

RING O’ ROSES A collection of Old Nursery Rhymes

THE HOUSE IN THE WOOD and Other Old Fairy Stories

A ROUNDABOUT TURN By ROBERT H. CHARLES

THE NURSERY RHYME BOOK Edited by ANDREW LANG

THE TAILOR AND THE CROW

 

048

Disclaimer: This eBook (Johnny Crow’s Party) is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net. The audio recording is mine—please do note where you got it (Corvid Corner), if you do redistribute it. Thanks. =)

Our Land Is The Sky: The Adventures of Jimmy Fastwing

I love my crows. And I love books. And I really love books about crows.

I recently read a charming story of Jimmy Fastwing, a young crow, in the journey of his first year of life. This book walks you through the life of a young, clever crow named Jimmy Fastwing. Life isn’t easy being a crow. It is easy for us to forget how very few crow actually survive through their first year. Less than half of the crows hatched will survive each year. The odds are not in their favor. Add in the constant danger from dogs, cats and humans who despite crows, and the first year of a crow’s life is as action packed as any blockbuster movie. Our Land is the Sky: The Adventures of Jimmy Fastwing by Frank J. Croskerry gives us a peek into the day to day life and struggles of one little brave crow. From the publisher, a more articulate description of this lovely little book,

Spring has been a violent affair this year, and many new crows have not survived the high winds and rainstorms. For the few who have, there are still the very dangerous exercises of learning what birds need to know to exist with the rest of the clan. While flying comes naturally to them, there is much more they need to know if they are to stay out of harm’s reach. Young crow Jimmy Fastwing has his grandfather to teach him the basic things a young crow needs to know. If he can manage the first stages of take-offs and landings, there will be other family members to assist him in his learning. He’ll have to know about things like finding food, hiding it, and socializing with the clan. Join Jimmy in his first year of life as he grows, learns, and avoids one calamity after another. If he’s lucky, he’ll learn quickly enough to become an important member of the clan.

One of my favorite quirky parts of this story is that Frank Croskerry adds in little cute crow puns like “crow-sing” for cruising, “crow-d”, and cawcaphony… I have a penchant for such puns. I used them here on CorvidCorner myself with “crow-tations” and so each time I read one of his clever little puns I smiled and chuckled to myself. Fun!

I recommend this book for all who love crows, birds or just a good fictional story of the natural world. Our Land is the Sky: The Adventures of Jimmy Fastwing is a juvenile fiction book, 88 pages. I read it in an hour or so. I even read it aloud for a friend. I think it is a great story to read to your children, to your friends, to anyone interested in learning more about crows and their social nature and their struggle to survive the first year of life. Thank you Frank J. Croskerry for this charming read. It now has a permanent place in my ever-growing library of crow-related books.

Plant Your Feathers By Cyndie Morrell (McAuliff)

Today, I have the pleasure of sharing with you a story written by one of our readers, Cyndie Morrell. Now, it’s all hers…

Dedicated to my mom, Faith Booth, who encouraged rather than ridiculed me when I started planting feathers in the pot full of dying foliage that graced the lobby of her apartment building.

Plant Your Feathers

By Cyndie Morrell (McAuliff)

As we walked up the hill toward home, the sound of the crows calling fell down around my ears from the treetops. I was oblivious to the sound of Zeeks voice. The bold, black birds had me mesmerized. Night was descending upon us. The wind whipped leaves around our feet. I heard them chant again; “You’re CAWWWGHT CAWWWGHT”. I knew as they mocked me that they spoke only the truth. I was caught. Caught listening again to this man who loved the sound of his own voice, who knew all the answers.

Suddenly there was a commotion in the sky. Two of the birds clashed above our heads. They beat their wings at each other. Their frantic screaming pierced the oncoming night. They pecked and prodded at each other with beaks and feet. As they pulled apart, I saw one rip at the other with its talons, pulling feathers from its wing. They fluttered to earth, those one, two three, four, five, six, seven blue-black crow feathers. I scurried to gather them before they got lost in the leaves or carried away by the wind.

The Crow Girls

After the fantastic response to my audio recording of Charles de Lint’s Make a Joyful Noise (listen to it here), I decided to make a concerted effort to find all the literary references to these two magical characters, the Crow Girls. I have read them in various stories and books of Charles de Lint’s. I will revisit his books again to comb through them to find where and when they appear. If you know of any off the top of your head, please leave a comment and I will add them to this post.

The first reference that comes to mind, aside from Make a Joyful Noise, is in The Onion Girl. This is one of my very favorite books by Charles de Lint and includes other amazing characters like Jilly Coppercorn who I believe everyone should have the opportunity to get to know. Another couple stories or books I remember reading about the Crow Girls were in Someplace to be flying, Triskell Tales and Triskell Tales 2 (available only for 2nd hand purchase). I will list all the pages where the Crow Girls debut soon. In the meantime, I found these wonderful references or stories about the Crow Girls around the web…

The Crow Girls (art) by Erin Kelso

The Crow Girls (fan art by Erin Kelso)

Character Connections Charles de Lint by The Introverted Reader — This is an interesting character connection and delightful description of the Crow Girls textually supported. =)

A Crow Girls Christmas by Charles de Lint and his wife — This is both a short story AND a wonderful artistic rendition of the Crow Girls by his wife, Mary Ann Harris. Click on the title to go to Charles de Lint’s website to read this charming short story!

The Crow Girls Christmas (art by Mary Ann Harris)
The Crow Girls Christmas (art by Mary Ann Harris)

More to come soon…

Make a Joyful Noise Audio Recording

Make a Joyful Noise by Charles DeLint

A few weeks ago I posted about Make a Joyful Noise written by Charles de Lint (read post here). I enthusiastically shared two of my favorite literary characters, the Crow Girls, Maida and Zia. This story is not available to purchase anymore but since I had a copy I thought I would ask the author if I could record it and post it on Corvid Corner to allow other crow lovers to enjoy it as well. Much to my surprise, he said I could! =)

And without further delay here is the story…(don’t forget to bookmark it!).

Make a Joyful Noise (Part 1)

Make a Joyful Noise (Part 2)

Make a Joyful Noise ( Part 3)

Make a Joyful Noise (Part 4)

Make a Joyful Noise (Part 5)

Make a Joyful Noise (Part 6)

A friend made the following graphic to go with this audio recording. Thank you.

Please do NOT redistribute this recording elsewhere or re-post it on other sites. If you enjoy it and wish to share it you can send a link to this post to as many people as you would like. We want to be respectful of copyright laws and issues and not take advantage of the kindness of Charles de Lint in allowing me to share this here. =) Thank you and enjoy!

Update 1/10/2011: I started a new post for more information on these two beautiful characters, the Crow Girls here. Perhaps together we corvid lovers can find all references to them and share them with the world.

A Crow Story by Leigh Hilbert

, originally uploaded by SparkyLeigh.

One sunny day in the small fishing village of Tofino, my then home on the outer west coast of Canada, I was in the mood to visit friends. I chose Jasper and Cristina on Neill Street. Jasper was out but Cristina put on some tea and we sat chatting in her living room. I was sitting on a couch with my back to the front windows. As Christina was talking I was gazing absently across the room and out the home’s back windows, towards the forested yard beyond. At some point I began to notice not the backyard but the reflection in the back window of the front yard behind me.

And in that reflection was a crow on a wire.

Now that’s not too unusual, except the crow was upside down. So while I continued to stare at this upside down image of a crow I was thinking it must be a trick of reflection between the two opposite windows creating a reversed image. Cristina was still talking but by then I was less than half listening, being pre-occupied by this mind twister. So to confirm my optical illusion theory I turned around to look out the front window at the crow on the wire. The crow was still upside down! –And motionless. I quickly came to the conclusion it was electrocuted and dead. The wire it was on ran across the front yard from the street’s power pole to the house, only twenty feet away, so quite easy to see.

I said to Cristina, “Hey, come and look at this.”

As she looked out, the still upside down crow, hanging by its talons, began swinging back and forth making progressively larger arcs.

After a short while, this apparently very alive crow let go of one talon and continued swinging from the other– back and forth! It then reached up with the free talon, grabbed on and let the other one go. It continued swinging upside down, only now it was also twisting from side to side!

Cristina and I looked at each other dumbfounded and then back to the coxcomb crow, which was now “walking” upside down along the wire! Suddenly the crow held on to the wire with both talons again, hung motionless for a short time, then let go, falling head first toward the ground—wings tucked tight to its sides. Just before it hit the ground it opened its wings and flew straight up to the adjacent wire nearer the porch.

Landing upright, like a normal crow, it stood still for a few seconds then fell over forward, talons loosely gripping the wire, instantly going into its reversed swinging like a gymnast on the high-bar!

Another crow was also on this wire with its head cocked, watching. Meanwhile, the performing crow carried on doing the single-talon trick. Then, before our incredulous eyes, it bent up from its upside down position, bit the wire with its beak and let go of its talons. Now, hanging by only its beak, the crow twisted back and forth! I was in awe.

Its final act was hanging head-to-earth by both talons and rotating in place, walking in circles, and one last time it hung motionless then fell towards the ground, opening its wings at just the very last split-second, and flying off.

Now for the second part of the story:

I had of course related this experience to a number of friends, but not to my girlfriend Bonnie. She had been out of town tree-planting and visiting her family in the distant province of Alberta. When she returned I began re-enacting the whole story to her, pretending I was the crow to demonstrate its wild antics (not easy to do!). While I was doing this she got this blank expression on her face and interrupted me to ask if this had happened a couple of days before the last full moon.

As it turned out, precisely on the day Cristina and I watched the crow, Bonnie had walked into a farm field near her folk’s home in Alberta and laid down grass while thinking of her friends in Tofino and me.

Bonnie practiced Wicca, a form of good magic, using it for healing and prayer, so her powers for evoking were unusually polished. So while lying on the field she decided to try and send me a telepathically projected event. She wanted something funny that I would notice. She said she first thought of a crow stealing my cinnamon bun while I had my daily munch outside our local bakeshop – but decided that wasn’t good enough (and far too common!). So she sent out from herself a message to the crows — for them to come up with a funny event — and released these thoughts toward me in Tofino, many hundreds of miles away.

Wow! After hearing her story I was the one with a baffled, blank expression! Things like this open my perception of reality. Its nice to know that magic is alive in this world, if only we open to allowing ourselves to be with it.

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A Crow Story is copyright of Leigh R. Hilbert –All Rights Reserved

The Crow and the Pitcher more than fable?

The Crow and the Pitcher, originally uploaded by AnnaleeBlysse.

Scientists believe the fable of the crow and the pitcher might have been fairly accurate given the new research showing rooks using rocks to raise the level of water where a worm resided… to bring the worm up to their level.1

They are such incredibly intelligent birds. The other animal who showed fluid mechanics was the orangutan. I will bet corvids are just as smart if not smarter than many of the primates.

You can read more about the studies here.

  1. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/wildlife/5983953/Aesops-fable-is-true-shows-crow-study.html []

Make a Joyful Noise

Crows make for interesting subjects in art and photography and they also make for meaningful symbols and delightful characters in literature. This is one of my favorite depictions of the magic of crows…

Charles de Lint imagined a pair of crow girls, Zia and Maida, who are mischievous and magical. They are obsessed with shiny objects and can just as easily finish each others sentences as ignore anyone else around them! Most people think they are inseparable because they are so cohesively adjoined but they are individuals. You can read how Charles de Lint sets this dynamic up in the following paragraph…

Everyone thinks we’re sisters, but it’s not as simple as that. If I let my thoughts drift far enough back into the long ago–the long, long ago, before Raven stirred that old pot of his and poured out the stew of the world–we were there. The two of us. Separate, but so much the same that I suppose we could have been sisters. But neither of us remember parents, and don’t you need them to be siblings? So what exactly our relationship is, I don’t know. We’ve never known. We just are. Two little mysteries that remain unchanged while the world changes all around us.

Charles de Lint includes the crow girls in a few different stories he has written and has put out at least one limited edition chapbook, Make a Joyful Noise. It was published by Subterranean Press but is no longer available. There were 574 unsigned numbered copies and 26 signed lettered copies. I was fortunate enough to get copy 401 of the unsigned numbered copies! I do hope for all of you who have not had the chance to read this wonderful story that they will print a second edition.

In the meantime let me share another paragraph from the story,

“Once upon a time, they all lived happily every after. The end. That’s a much better sort of story than the messy ones that make up our lives. At least that’s what I think. But I wouldn’t want to live in that story, because that would be too boring. I’d rather be caught up in the clutter of living, flying high above the streets and houses, making a joyful noise.”

The End.

UPDATED 1/4/2011: Charles de Lint has given me permission to read and record this story and share with all of you. I started a new post for it, here.

UPDATED 1/10/2011: I added a new post about other references to the Crow Girls here.