An Injured Crow

I have many bird visitors daily to my feeders. The past few days a crow has been visiting. This crow is beautiful, younger but this crow is injured. And it makes me so sad to see the bird limp. =(

You can see him/her nursing its leg. =(

The crow didn’t fly away like most do when I get too close. It is injured and worried but I was not hasty in approaching it.

I made some calls to the local wildlife organization to see if they could help. If you find an injured crow (or any bird) or an abandoned nest or hatchling (baby bird), you can call or visit the website of national organization to find your local facilities:

When in doubt, just call your local humane society and ask what to do or who to call. They should be able to help direct you to the appropriate people to contact. If you really can’t figure out anyone to call, write me at crowgyrls at gmail dot com. I will find someone for you to call.

My local wildlife organization told me to see if I can catch the crow and bring it in. They recommended using a towel or a sheet. Crows are nervous by nature (and rightfully so). It may take a bit to catch them, if you can at all. If the crow can fly, they will probably evade you. And crows have an amazing memory and can teach their young to avoid particular people. So, be prepared to be the bad guy for awhile. Perhaps permanently. It is not for the faint of heart, helping transport a crow to an animal hospital or wildlife facility.

I will let you know how this goes…

Deformed beaks…a mystery

deformed

Birds’ beaks are made of keratin, similar to human fingernails and hair. Normally, beaks wear down with use, continuing to grow at the same time. There’s a balance. But something is causing this super-fast growth — and it doesn’t get turned off. There seems to be a concentration in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska but the cause is unknown still.

read more | digg story

Read more about this mystery at the Alaska Science Center or the Falcon Research Group or the University of Michigan Dearborn.

Corvid Abnormalities

Abnormalities can be found in all life forms–corvids included. Here are some interesting photos I found of corvids with two abnormalities deformed beaks and partial albino-ism–leucistic or albino corvids.

crows_partially_albino
Leucistic (partially-albino) crow

Albino Steller's Jay
Albino Steller's Jay

Leucistic (partially-albino) magpie (Photo from Messybeast.com)
Leucistic (partially-albino) magpie (Photo from Messybeast.com)

Leucistic (partially-albino) Jackdaw (Photo Source: Surfbirds.com)
Leucistic (partially-albino) Jackdaw (Photo Source: Surfbirds.com)

x_bill_raven_308
Raven with a deformed bill

Crow with deformed beak
Crow with deformed beak

Crow with deformed beak
Crow with deformed beak

Steller's Jay with deformed beak
Steller's Jay with deformed beak

Read about THE MYSTERY OF THE LONG-BEAK SYNDROME here. Or you can read Passerines with Deformed Bills by Julie A. Craves (an article) here.

There seems to be a high concentration of birds with deformed beaks in the Pacific Northwest–I wonder why.