Caw! Caw! The Chronicle of Crows (Part 5)

Now, here is part 5 of Caw! Caw! The Chronicle of Crows: A Tale of the Spring-time by RM and Illustrated by JB;

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And tomorrow, the last part of this book will be posted. =)

If you missed any parts of this book, you can see all the parts here:

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of CAW! CAW!, by RM

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever.  You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org

Title: CAW! CAW!
The Chronicle of Crows, A Tale of the Spring-time
Author: RM
Illustrator: JB
Release Date: August 22, 2007 [EBook #22374]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1

Caw! Caw! The Chronicle of Crows (Part 3)

And part three of Caw! Caw! Or The Chronicle of Crows: A Tale of the Spring-time by RM, illustrated by J.B. as promised… (if you’ve missed the first two parts, scroll to the end of the email to see them first)…

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cawcaw2 (5)

 

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The next part of this book will be posted tomorrow! =)

If you missed any parts of this book, you can see all the parts here:

_______________________________________________

The Project Gutenberg EBook of CAW! CAW!, by RM

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever.  You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org

Caw! Caw! The Chronicle of Crows (Part 2)

And for part 2 of x of Caw! Caw! Or The Chronicle of Crows: A Tale of the Spring-time by R.M. Illustrated by J.B.,

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Come again tomorrow for the next part of this lovely book!

If you missed any parts of this book, you can see all the parts here:

———————————————————————–

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever.  You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org

Title: CAW! CAW!
       The Chronicle of Crows, A Tale of the Spring-time
Author: RM
Illustrator: JB
Release Date: August 22, 2007 [EBook #22374]
Language: English

Caw! Caw! The Chronicle of Crows: A Tale of the Spring-time by RM

Caw! Caw! Or The Chronicle of Crows: A Tale of the Spring-time by RM, illustrated by J.B. It is a fun, lovely crow book. Lots of poetry with crows. This is well-worth the read. Try reading it aloud! =) If you dare, try reading it aloud AND recording it for me to post! =) I’d love that. Here are the first six pages… beautiful illustrations as well as fun poems. I will post the next six or so pages tomorrow. =) I hope you enjoy!

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cawcaw (5)

 

cawcaw (6)

 

cawcaw (7)

 

The next part of this book will be posted tomorrow, so don’t forget to come back!

If you missed any parts of this book, you can see all the parts here:

——————————————————————————————–

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever.  You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org

Title: CAW! CAW!
       The Chronicle of Crows, A Tale of the Spring-time
Author: RM
Illustrator: JB
Release Date: August 22, 2007 [EBook #22374]
Language: English

Johnny Crow’s Garden

Following the March theme of National Read Aloud month, I am sharing another lovely story about Johnny Crow by L. Leslie Brooke. This one is titled Johnny Crow’s Garden. It is read aloud by someone, but I am not certain whom. I got the files from the Project Gutenberg e-book series. I hope you enjoy it. =) Click the following title (Johnny Crow’s Garden) to listen:

Johnny Crow’s Garden

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JOHNNY CROW’S GARDEN

A PICTURE BOOK

DRAWN BY

L. LESLIE BROOKE

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First Edition, 1903

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JOHNNY CROW’S GARDEN.

 

Johnny Crow Would dig and sow
Johnny Crow
Would dig and sow

 

Till he made a little Garden.
Till he made a little Garden.

 

And the Lion
And the Lion

 

Had a green and yellow Tie on
Had a green and yellow Tie on

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

And the Rat Wore a Feather in his Hat
And the Rat
Wore a Feather in his Hat

 

But the Bear Had nothing to wear
But the Bear
Had nothing to wear

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

So the Ape
So the Ape

 

Took his Measure with a Tape
Took his Measure with a Tape

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

Then the Crane
Then the Crane

 

Was caught in the Rain
Was caught in the Rain

 

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

And the Beaver Was afraid he had a Fever
And the Beaver
Was afraid he had a Fever

 

But the Goat Said:
But the Goat
Said:

 

"It's nothing but his Throat!"
“It’s nothing but his Throat!”

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

And the Pig Danced a Jig
And the Pig
Danced a Jig

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

Then the Stork Gave a Philosophic Talk
Then the Stork
Gave a Philosophic Talk

 

Till the Hippopotami Said: "Ask no further 'What am I?'"
Till the Hippopotami
Said: “Ask no further ‘What am I?'”

 

While the Elephant Said something quite irrelevant
While the Elephant
Said something quite irrelevant

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

And the Goose-- Well,
And the Goose–
Well,

 

the Goose was a Goose
the Goose was a Goose

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

And the Mouse
And the Mouse

 

Built himself a little House
Built himself a little House

 

Where the Cat
Where the Cat

 

Sat down beside the Mat
Sat down beside the Mat

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

And the Whale
And the Whale

 

Told a very long Tale
Told a very long Tale

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

And the Owl Was a funny old Fowl
And the Owl
Was a funny old Fowl

 

And the Fox
And the Fox

 

Put them all in the Stocks
Put them all in the Stocks

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

But Johnny Crow He let them go
But Johnny Crow
He let them go

 

And they all sat down to their dinner in a row
And they all sat down
to their dinner in a row

 

In Johnny Crow's Garden.
In Johnny Crow’s Garden.

 

“GOOD-BYE!”

This eBook (Johnny Crow’s Garden) is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net

 

St. Kevin and Crows

Art by Clive Hicks-Jenkins

After learning all about Saint Benedict of Nursia and his affiliation with crows, I did some research on other saints and crows. I found St. Kevin, the Patron Saint of Crows! How cool is that? Who knew? Well, apparently some people. He was born in 498 and reportedly died 120 years later in 618. He is also the Patron Saint of Ireland, Dublin, Glendalough and crows to be exact. Saint Kevin of Glendalough. He is often depicted with crows and is said to have preferred the company of animals to humans. So strong was his preference for animals, songs with his story tell of him drowning a woman who tried to seduce him. Yet, he was said to have infinite patience and kindness?1 Even deemed the “gentle one”. Legend says he once allowed a crow to lay an egg in his palm and he held it safely until the egg hatched and the little bird flew away. It would seem those who thought him gentle were much more impressed by his skills with animals than his people skills.

Seamus Heaney wrote the following about St. Kevin,2

“And then there was St Kevin and the blackbird.
The saint is kneeling, arms stretched out, inside
His cell, but the cell is narrow, so

One turned-up palm is out the window, stiff
As a crossbeam, when a blackbird lands
and Lays in it and settles down to nest.”

Art by LINDA JAQUES

 

Sources:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/lasi/lasi03.htm

http://patriarts.com/Kevin/Kevin%20manuscript1.htm

http://asinnersguidetothesaints.blogspot.com/2010/06/st-kevin-of-glendalough-498-to-june-3.html

http://patriarts.com/Kevin/Kevin.htm

http://saintspreserved.com/Kevin/St_Kevin.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kevin_of_Glendalough

http://saints.sqpn.com/saint-kevin-of-glendalough/

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kevin_of_Glendalough []
  2. http://asinnersguidetothesaints.blogspot.com/2010/06/st-kevin-of-glendalough-498-to-june-3.html []

Saint Benedict of Nursia

Original photo from the Saint Martin’s University website.

 

 

While driving around a beautiful university campus I came across a monastery with a lovely statue in front. It was a bronze statue of Saint Benedict of Nursia with a book in one hand a crow on his shoulder. I had not previously read about this saint or his story. But I found it interesting that he is depicted most times with crows. Here are a couple pictures of the statue I saw on the lawn near the abbey at Saint Martin’s University in Olympia, Washington. (They are not the greatest because I felt rude going on the lawn to get head on shots. Maybe next time I go I will ask if for permission.)

Bronze statue of Saint Benedict of Nursia seen at the Saint Martin’s University in Olympia, WA.

 

 

According to the Saint Martin’s University website,1

The dynamic, larger-than-life, bronze statue of Saint Benedict of Nursia, Father of Western monasticism and patron saint of the Catholic Benedictine order, stands near the Abbey Church. The statue, by Russian-born artist Simon Kogan, is a reminder of the 1,500-year-old Benedictine heritage that is part of the fabric of Saint Martin’s. Among the hallmarks are hospitality, service and a commitment to work, prayer and learning.

 

Bronze statue of Saint Benedict of Nursia seen at the Saint Martin’s University in Olympia, WA.

 

Crows were important to Saint Benedict of Nursia according to the French legend of the monk, Benedict of Nursia, who is known as the father of the monastic rule of the Benedictines. In French, a saying, “D’or aux trois corbeaux de sable posés deux et un” which translates into “Of gold, three sand crows posed two and one” denotes this very legend. It was said that Saint Benedict lived within a cave far away from the people and shared his food faithfully with a crow who visited him daily. This crow grew to love the monk and Saint Benedict grew to love the crow(s). A jealous priest sent poisoned bread to kill Saint Benedict but he was wise and gave it to the crows telling them to throw in a place far, far, far from any man. And so the crows did as he said and became the symbol of obligingness, intelligence and fidelity.23456

Another spin on the legend makes it Saint Benedict and the raven from the Dialogues of St. Gregory the Great,7
 

When as the foresaid monasteries were zealous in the love of our Lord Jesus Christ, and their fame dispersed far and near, and many gave over the secular life, and subdued the passions of their soul, under the light yoke of our Saviour: then (as the manner of wicked people is, to envy at that virtue which themselves desire not to follow) one Florentius, Priest of a church nearby, and grandfather to Florentius our sub-deacon, possessed with diabolical malice, began to envy the holy man’s [Benedict’s] virtues, to back-bite his manner of living, and to withdraw as many as he could from going to visit him.

When he saw that he could not hinder his virtuous proceedings, but that, on the contrary, the fame of his holy life increased, and many daily, on the very report of his sanctity, took themselves to a better state of life : burning more and more with the coals of envy, he became far worse; and though he desired not to imitate his commendable life, yet fain he would have had the reputation of his virtuous conversation.

In conclusion so much did malicious envy blind him, and so far did he wade in that sin, that he poisoned a loaf and sent it to the servant of almighty God, as it were for a holy present. The man of God received it with great thanks, yet not ignorant of that which was hidden within. At dinner time, a crow daily used to come to him from the next wood, which took bread at his hands; coming that day after his manner, the man of God threw him the loaf which the Priest had sent him, giving him this charge: “In the name of Jesus Christ our Lord, take up that loaf, and leave it in some such place where no man may find it.” Then the crow, opening his mouth, and lifting up his wings, began to hop up and down about the loaf, and after his manner to cry out, as though he would have said that he was willing to obey, and yet could not do what he was commanded.

The man of God again and again bide him, saying: “Take it up without fear, and throw it where no man may find it.” At length, with much ado, the crow took it up, and flew away, and after three hours, having dispatched the loaf, he returned again, and received his usual allowance from the man of God.

 

Bronze statue of Saint Benedict of Nursia seen at the Saint Martin’s University in Olympia, WA.

 

In my research on Saint Benedict of Nursia, I found this other statue depicting him with crows, as well. The legends all include his love for crows and how he helps them and they help him. This makes him a memorable saint for me. An old-school corvid lover. =)

“Saint Benedict” by Br. David Paul Lange OSB – Photo: Mary van Balen
  1. http://www.stmartin.edu/about/tour/BenedictStatue.aspx []
  2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoenheim []
  3. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02467b.htm []
  4. http://www.idahomonks.org/sect501.htm []
  5. http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2008/07/feast-of-st-benedict.html []
  6. http://www.indiana.edu/~engs/benpamphlet.html []
  7. http://www.fisheaters.com/animals4.html []

Our Land Is The Sky: The Adventures of Jimmy Fastwing

I love my crows. And I love books. And I really love books about crows.

I recently read a charming story of Jimmy Fastwing, a young crow, in the journey of his first year of life. This book walks you through the life of a young, clever crow named Jimmy Fastwing. Life isn’t easy being a crow. It is easy for us to forget how very few crow actually survive through their first year. Less than half of the crows hatched will survive each year. The odds are not in their favor. Add in the constant danger from dogs, cats and humans who despite crows, and the first year of a crow’s life is as action packed as any blockbuster movie. Our Land is the Sky: The Adventures of Jimmy Fastwing by Frank J. Croskerry gives us a peek into the day to day life and struggles of one little brave crow. From the publisher, a more articulate description of this lovely little book,

Spring has been a violent affair this year, and many new crows have not survived the high winds and rainstorms. For the few who have, there are still the very dangerous exercises of learning what birds need to know to exist with the rest of the clan. While flying comes naturally to them, there is much more they need to know if they are to stay out of harm’s reach. Young crow Jimmy Fastwing has his grandfather to teach him the basic things a young crow needs to know. If he can manage the first stages of take-offs and landings, there will be other family members to assist him in his learning. He’ll have to know about things like finding food, hiding it, and socializing with the clan. Join Jimmy in his first year of life as he grows, learns, and avoids one calamity after another. If he’s lucky, he’ll learn quickly enough to become an important member of the clan.

One of my favorite quirky parts of this story is that Frank Croskerry adds in little cute crow puns like “crow-sing” for cruising, “crow-d”, and cawcaphony… I have a penchant for such puns. I used them here on CorvidCorner myself with “crow-tations” and so each time I read one of his clever little puns I smiled and chuckled to myself. Fun!

I recommend this book for all who love crows, birds or just a good fictional story of the natural world. Our Land is the Sky: The Adventures of Jimmy Fastwing is a juvenile fiction book, 88 pages. I read it in an hour or so. I even read it aloud for a friend. I think it is a great story to read to your children, to your friends, to anyone interested in learning more about crows and their social nature and their struggle to survive the first year of life. Thank you Frank J. Croskerry for this charming read. It now has a permanent place in my ever-growing library of crow-related books.

Omens related to a Crow according to Vastu Shastra

Here are some omens related to crows according to Vastu Shastra (an ancient Indian doctrine):

  • Crow is probably the most common bird in India and hence they are often ignored as mere scavengers. But Vastu Shastra associates a number of omens with it. These omens are as follows:-
  • If a crow coming from the south-west side in the evening is seen it is an indication for some approaching calamity.
  • If a crow coming from the South-East direction in the evening is seen it indicates monetary gain.
  • When a crow drops a piece of burnt wood, bone or meat on the bed of a person it indicates approaching danger or death in the near future.
  • If a crow passes from the left crowing it is considered a good omen.
  • When many crows start crowing together in a corner or around the house it indicates approaching danger.
  • Early in the morning when a crow comes flying from the North-East direction it indicates some good news.
  • The crowing of a crow on the roof is inauspicious.
  • If it sits on someone`s head it is inauspicious.
  • When a crow is calling out with its face towards the South the head of the family will have a nice time.
  • In case one sees a crow sitting on the back of a pig it indicates legal complications. However if it is sitting on a camel or a donkey if it is seen it is considered a good omen.
  • When a person sees a crow flying in the clockwise direction he or she faces bad relations with his relatives.
  • When the ear of corn, flower or sand stone is seen in the beck of a crow it indicates monetary gain for that person.
  • When a crow carries a vessel or some costly article it is associated with danger. When a crow brings grass or burnt wood in our place he indicates danger from fire.
  • When a crow starts crowing with its face towards the South-West it indicates monetary gain for the person who watches it.
  • A person is likely to gain jewelry when a crow crows with his face towards the South-East direction.
  • If a person sees a crow sitting on a tree laden with fruit he will receive wealth and honor.
  • When a crow calls out facing the North-West the head of the family gets grain and arms as gifts.
  • When a crow crows with its face towards the North the head of the family has chances of getting new clothes or vehicle.
  • If a crow comes into the house and crows it indicates the coming of guests.
  • The person who sees a crow sitting on the back of a horse gets a new vehicle.
  • When a person sees a crow sitting on the tail of a cow and crowing he or she faces ill health.
  • Seeing two crows together brings bad news.
  • When the crow crows facing the North-East the head of the family will be subject to monetary gains.