Caw! Caw! The Chronicle of Crows (Part 3)

And part three of Caw! Caw! Or The Chronicle of Crows: A Tale of the Spring-time by RM, illustrated by J.B. as promised… (if you’ve missed the first two parts, scroll to the end of the email to see them first)…

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cawcaw2 (3)

 

cawcaw2 (4)

 

cawcaw2 (5)

 

cawcaw2 (6)

The next part of this book will be posted tomorrow! =)

If you missed any parts of this book, you can see all the parts here:

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of CAW! CAW!, by RM

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever.  You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org

Caw! Caw! The Chronicle of Crows: A Tale of the Spring-time by RM

Caw! Caw! Or The Chronicle of Crows: A Tale of the Spring-time by RM, illustrated by J.B. It is a fun, lovely crow book. Lots of poetry with crows. This is well-worth the read. Try reading it aloud! =) If you dare, try reading it aloud AND recording it for me to post! =) I’d love that. Here are the first six pages… beautiful illustrations as well as fun poems. I will post the next six or so pages tomorrow. =) I hope you enjoy!

cawcaw (2)

 

cawcaw (3)

 

cawcaw (4)

 

cawcaw (5)

 

cawcaw (6)

 

cawcaw (7)

 

The next part of this book will be posted tomorrow, so don’t forget to come back!

If you missed any parts of this book, you can see all the parts here:

——————————————————————————————–

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever.  You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org

Title: CAW! CAW!
       The Chronicle of Crows, A Tale of the Spring-time
Author: RM
Illustrator: JB
Release Date: August 22, 2007 [EBook #22374]
Language: English

Corvids: An Australian export?

I read an interesting article about corvids in Australia at The Conversation. I don’t like to re-post full articles so, I will post a snippet and a link…

Corvids feature in the cave art of early humans. Their voices and actions reportedly stimulate human language and culture. Some research suggests that when humans interact with social crows, the things they see and learn can inspire their own rapid cultural evolution. Crows also seem to do things that people do (“talk” to each other, steal and hide things, use tools, “tease” other species, play), so it’s possible we’re all learning from one another.

You can read the whole article here.

Steller’s Jay at Crater Lake in Oregon

Copyright © 2012 Corvid Corner. All rights reserved.

 

What a beautiful little bird! According to the Crater Lake Institute, four of the six birds mostly like to be seen at Crater Lake in Oregon are corvids: Ravens, Gray Jays, Stellers’ Jays, and Clark’s Nutcrackers (see yesterday’s post about this clever little corvid!)

Maybe we can nickname it Corvid Lake =).

((http://www.craterlakeinstitute.com/planning-visit/faqs/birds-crater-lake.htm))

St. Kevin and Crows

Art by Clive Hicks-Jenkins

After learning all about Saint Benedict of Nursia and his affiliation with crows, I did some research on other saints and crows. I found St. Kevin, the Patron Saint of Crows! How cool is that? Who knew? Well, apparently some people. He was born in 498 and reportedly died 120 years later in 618. He is also the Patron Saint of Ireland, Dublin, Glendalough and crows to be exact. Saint Kevin of Glendalough. He is often depicted with crows and is said to have preferred the company of animals to humans. So strong was his preference for animals, songs with his story tell of him drowning a woman who tried to seduce him. Yet, he was said to have infinite patience and kindness? ((http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kevin_of_Glendalough)) Even deemed the “gentle one”. Legend says he once allowed a crow to lay an egg in his palm and he held it safely until the egg hatched and the little bird flew away. It would seem those who thought him gentle were much more impressed by his skills with animals than his people skills.

Seamus Heaney wrote the following about St. Kevin, ((http://asinnersguidetothesaints.blogspot.com/2010/06/st-kevin-of-glendalough-498-to-june-3.html))

“And then there was St Kevin and the blackbird.
The saint is kneeling, arms stretched out, inside
His cell, but the cell is narrow, so

One turned-up palm is out the window, stiff
As a crossbeam, when a blackbird lands
and Lays in it and settles down to nest.”

Art by LINDA JAQUES

 

Sources:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/lasi/lasi03.htm

http://patriarts.com/Kevin/Kevin%20manuscript1.htm

http://asinnersguidetothesaints.blogspot.com/2010/06/st-kevin-of-glendalough-498-to-june-3.html

http://patriarts.com/Kevin/Kevin.htm

http://saintspreserved.com/Kevin/St_Kevin.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kevin_of_Glendalough

http://saints.sqpn.com/saint-kevin-of-glendalough/