Corvid Abnormalities

Abnormalities can be found in all life forms–corvids included. Here are some interesting photos I found of corvids with two abnormalities deformed beaks and partial albino-ism–leucistic or albino corvids.

crows_partially_albino
Leucistic (partially-albino) crow

Albino Steller's Jay
Albino Steller's Jay

Leucistic (partially-albino) magpie (Photo from Messybeast.com)
Leucistic (partially-albino) magpie (Photo from Messybeast.com)

Leucistic (partially-albino) Jackdaw (Photo Source: Surfbirds.com)
Leucistic (partially-albino) Jackdaw (Photo Source: Surfbirds.com)

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Raven with a deformed bill

Crow with deformed beak
Crow with deformed beak

Crow with deformed beak
Crow with deformed beak

Steller's Jay with deformed beak
Steller's Jay with deformed beak

Read about THE MYSTERY OF THE LONG-BEAK SYNDROME here. Or you can read Passerines with Deformed Bills by Julie A. Craves (an article) here.

There seems to be a high concentration of birds with deformed beaks in the Pacific Northwest–I wonder why.

Plush-crested Jay (Cyanocorax chrysops)

The corvid family is big. I have to start somewhere in these posts so I have randomly chosen the Plush-crested Jay, Cyanocorax chrysops. It is a magnificent bird—so beautiful and brilliant colors. I saw this photograph and it enticed me to pick it!

Plush-crested Jay
Plush-crested Jay

How could I resist such a pretty bird?

It lives in the central-southern part of South America: Brazil, Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay and northeastern Argentina.

The Plush-crested Jay normally live in groups of up to 10 or 12 others. They also are found accompanying the Purplish Jay to feed. The Plush-crested Jay forages actively, hopping and peering about on branches and in foliage. They have a very loud and arresting call, which serves to draw attention to them. Like many corvids the Plush-crested Jay can also mimic other birds and are very sociable. Unlike crows, they are not shy at all.